Marvel exec Nate Moore wasn't happy about one particular character's fate in Infinity War, but he made peace with it in the end (SPOILERS)

News Kirsten Howard

May 22, 2018

Avengers: Infinity War landed in theaters pretty much everywhere around the world last month to cries of “just take our money!” – and it did. It took a lot of our money, and smashed all kinds of records across the board, but it also left us in pieces.

The spoilers are coming…

There was no aftercare in the weeks following Infinity War. No one in charge jumped up to reassure us that everything would be okay. There was no helpline in place to call after we witnessed Thanos get his way and Bucky, Groot, Doctor Strange, Spider-Man and so many others became dust in the wind.

One of the biggest shocks among the dead was King T’Challa, a.k.a. Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), especially after his standalone movie had done so well at the box office. We weren’t the only ones reeling from that particular departure, it turns out, as Marvel exec and Black Panther producer Nate Moore was also pretty upset, going so far as to urge directors the Russo brothers to change their minds about the move all the way back in 2015, before Ryan Coogler had even finished making his pre-Black Panther boxing movie, Creed.

“I knew pretty well what they were talking about and personally urged them to reconsider,” Moore told HuffPo. “But the storytelling made sense, so I love that we got to see a little bit more of Wakanda in [Infinity War], and I hope to see how they’re going to resolve that.”

Eventually, Moore came around to the Russos’ plan, but he didn’t go into the specific details of how they managed to convince him it was the right decision.

“Touching on all the different ideas you can have, you talk about the pros and cons of each, and they had some really compelling arguments as to why what happened happened,” he said. “I think ultimately it made for a really interesting, almost more complicated ending to that film because of how well Black Panther was embraced by audiences. Again, personally painful, but I understand the reasoning.”