Just who is that little boy at the end of Star Wars: The Last Jedi and why is he important?

News

John Saavedra

Mar 14, 2018

This Star Wars article contains spoilers. 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi featured quite a few twists and turns. When Luke says, “This isn’t going to go the way you think,” he’s really not kidding. Episode VIII, which was written and directed by Rian Johnson, takes us to unexpected places and doesn’t really let up with the twists until the very last second. On top of that, the movie answers plenty of important questions, such as who Rey’s parents are, and also asks a few new ones. 

Fans have been asking one question in particular – and we’re about to hit SPOILER territory so turn back now while you have the chance. Who is the Force-sensitive boy working the stables in Canto Bight?


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Thanks to Star Wars: The Last Jedi – The Visual Dictionary, we now know that the boy’s name is Temiri Blagg (Temirlan Blaev), an orphan sold into indentured servitude by his parents in order to pay a gambling debt. It’s impossible not to see the parallels between Temiri’s story and Rey’s own past. The Visual Dictionary describes Temiri’s daily life under the servitude of the man and extremely ugly Bargwill Tomder. Along with his friends, Arashell Sar (Sarah Heller) and Oniho Zaya (Josiah Oniha), Temiri spends his days recreating stories he’s heard from all over the galaxy.

“Travelers from distant worlds bring them fragmented tales of adventure that excite their young imaginations,” reads The Visual Dictionary

This is why the final scene features Temiri and his friends playing with a makeshift doll of Jedi Master Luke Skywalker at the Battle of Crait. Luke’s final heroic act has become legend and lit the spark that will unite the galaxy against the First Order’s tyranny. The final scene, one that serves as a sort of coda to the rest of the film, is meant to show that hope has not been lost in Luke’s absence and that the Force can be found in the most unexpected of places. 

While the Prequel Trilogy featured countless Force users – to its severe detriment – both the Original and Sequel Trilogies have presented the ancient energy as a rare, tenuous thing only a select few possess. But where the original films only gifted the Skywalkers with such power, the Sequel Trilogy has seemingly democratized the Force to characters not of their line. Rey doesn’t have a famous lineage – in fact, she’s the daughter of alcoholic junk traders who sold her for drinking money – and neither does Temiri (to our knowledge). Yet they both possess the powers needed to fight back the darkness. 

Little else is known about Temiri – and it might very well be that he has no further significance in the story beyond this coda – but there’s always the potential that he is destined for greatness. We know from watching him longingly admiring the sky, just as Luke and Rey did before him, that he wants to be an adventurer and see worlds beyond the planet to which he is shackled.

The very last shot shows Temiri holding his broom like a lightsaber, imagining himself a Jedi like the great Master Skywalker. In the end, that is Luke’s legacy – passing down what he has learned through his heroic actions in order to inspire a new generation. Like Luke and Rey before him, Temiri could be the galaxy’s next great hero. A new hope.